This Slang Reveals Your Home State

This Slang Reveals Your Home State

In a country as large as the United States, it’s natural that certain regions have their own lingo. From fizzy drinks (“pop” in the Midwest) to the roadways that bring drivers from point A to point B (“freeways” in California), some words immediately call to mind a specific place. Test your American slang knowledge with some of these terms from around the country.

Ayuh

Pronounced “ah-yuh,”  in Maine, this word works in a similar way to “yup” or “yeah.” The history of the word “ayuh” is sparse, but it’s likely that it comes from the nautical word “aye,” which also means “yes.” While it has fallen out of favor with younger Mainers, Stephen King (who famously grew up in the state) uses the word often in his novels.

Cattywampus

Whether it’s spelled “cattywampus” or “catawampus,” in the South it means something that is either literally or figuratively crooked. Some sources attribute it to Alabama, while others claim North Carolina, but it can be used all over the South to mean a big old mess.

Read Article