Few will hear the shofar blown indoors this Rosh Hashanah. So rabbis are taking to the streets.

Few will hear the shofar blown indoors this Rosh Hashanah. So rabbis are taking to the streets.

Rabbi Aaron Potek has been getting ready for weeks now, rising each morning to sound his shofar, a hollowed-out ram’s horn used to usher in Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year.

Mostly, he performs the staccato blasts from his apartment in Dupont Circle. Sometimes, he blows it in front of Washington landmarks, including once at Nationals Park.

“I’ll blow wherever,” he said.

On the eve of Rosh Hashanah — Friday, Sept. 18 — Potek will sound his ram’s horn from the rooftop of Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, where he is a rabbi, as part of a coordinated mass shofar blowing dubbed “The Blast.”

The event is aimed at bringing the Jewish community together in a year when opportunities to gather in synagogue or for Rosh Hashanah meals have been greatly restricted by the coronavirus pandemic.

By Cathy Alter, The Washington Post

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